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belter [2011/06/14 00:49]
abiri
belter [2011/08/12 06:53] (current)
hagalaz [Physical Description]
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 The belter genome runs about 97 to 98 percent the same as human DNA, which technically makes them slightly less "​human"​ than most furry recoms, on average. However, their overall [[human]]-like appearance causes some prejudice against them. Recoms everywhere have adopted the remnants of human culture -- yet humans are also remembered by some recoms as the race that enslaved them, ruined the Earth, and finally wiped themselves out. Because they find gravity unpleasant, belters don't often visit the colonies of Luna, Mars and other planets. That causes them to be rarely seen by most other types of recom, and such unfamiliarity also colors encounters between the types. The belter genome runs about 97 to 98 percent the same as human DNA, which technically makes them slightly less "​human"​ than most furry recoms, on average. However, their overall [[human]]-like appearance causes some prejudice against them. Recoms everywhere have adopted the remnants of human culture -- yet humans are also remembered by some recoms as the race that enslaved them, ruined the Earth, and finally wiped themselves out. Because they find gravity unpleasant, belters don't often visit the colonies of Luna, Mars and other planets. That causes them to be rarely seen by most other types of recom, and such unfamiliarity also colors encounters between the types.
  
-In addition to their human-like appearance, belters differ from furry recoms in another important way: they have no legs. Instead of legs, each belter has at least four arms and hands, and often more. This allows the belter to anchor himself with one or two handholds while using the remaining hands for work. Belters occur in a number of species, just as furry recoms do. However, instead of canines, felines, mustelids and such, belter species have various forms with different numbers of arms and other body parts. The most common species is the "​quaddie"​ belter which appears with an second pair of arms in the place of human legs. Other species include "​hexies"​ with six arms, and some "​gemini"​ forms in which two are conjoined in one body. Some have prehensile tails, but most belters have no tail. Belters are found in the same genders as furry recoms: female, male, hermaphrodite and the occasional [[androgyne]].+In addition to their human-like appearance, belters differ from furry recoms in another important way: they have no legs. Instead of legs, each belter has at least four arms and hands, and often more. This allows the belter to anchor himself with one or two handholds while using the remaining hands for work. Belters occur in a number of species, just as furry recoms do. However, instead of canines, felines, mustelids and such, belter species have various forms with different numbers of arms and other body parts. The most common species is the "​quaddie"​ belter which appears with an second, heavy-duty ​pair of arms in the place of human legs. Other species include "​hexies"​ with six arms, and some "​gemini"​ forms in which two are conjoined in one body. Some have prehensile tails, but most belters have no tail. Belters are found in the same genders as furry recoms: female, male, hermaphrodite and the occasional [[androgyne]].
  
 The gemini belters are particularly distinctive. Conjoined forms are not unknown among recoms in general, but they are much more widespread among belters. These were originally designed on the theory that a conjoined form would require less resources to support than two recoms, while still being able to double-check each other and stay alert through long shifts of work. Geminis have developed their own traditions and viewpoints: their form requires them to learn the arts of cooperation and compromise to a high degree. They take pride in these skills, and feel that they exemplify the best qualities of belter society as a whole. Although conjoined furry recoms are often viewed as handicapped or freakish, gemini belters are more likely to be found among the "upper crust" of their society and are never viewed as being disadvantaged. The gemini belters are particularly distinctive. Conjoined forms are not unknown among recoms in general, but they are much more widespread among belters. These were originally designed on the theory that a conjoined form would require less resources to support than two recoms, while still being able to double-check each other and stay alert through long shifts of work. Geminis have developed their own traditions and viewpoints: their form requires them to learn the arts of cooperation and compromise to a high degree. They take pride in these skills, and feel that they exemplify the best qualities of belter society as a whole. Although conjoined furry recoms are often viewed as handicapped or freakish, gemini belters are more likely to be found among the "upper crust" of their society and are never viewed as being disadvantaged.
belter.txt ยท Last modified: 2011/08/12 06:53 by hagalaz