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polywell_fusion [2010/01/31 01:16]
zobeid created
polywell_fusion [2010/01/31 01:18] (current)
zobeid
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 The fuel of a polywell reactor is boron-11 and helium ions.  These elements are relatively plentiful and inexpensive throughout known space. ​ Polywell reactors do not produce nuclear waste, nor are they capable of meltdown or explosion. ​ They produce electrical energy directly, without thermal conversion, which makes them highly efficient and means they don't need the huge cooling towers of conventional power plants. The fuel of a polywell reactor is boron-11 and helium ions.  These elements are relatively plentiful and inexpensive throughout known space. ​ Polywell reactors do not produce nuclear waste, nor are they capable of meltdown or explosion. ​ They produce electrical energy directly, without thermal conversion, which makes them highly efficient and means they don't need the huge cooling towers of conventional power plants.
  
-There is a lower limit to the size a polywell can be made and produce net power. ​ This prevents them from being used in most vehicles, aside from spaceships and large ocean-going ships. ​ A huge fusion-powered aircraft was once built as a demonstration,​ but it proved impractical to operate. ​ Thus, most aircraft continue to burn liquid fuel, often biofuels. ​ Most of the rail networks are fusion powered, but only indirectly -- power is fed from stationary fusion plants through the track system to the locomotives. ​ Thus, a reactor is not carried on board the train itself. ​ Also, most automobiles ​in our setting ​use [[power cells]]which are charged from the electrical grid with fusion-generated electricity.+There is a lower limit to the size a polywell can be made and produce net power. ​ This prevents them from being used in most vehicles, aside from spaceships and large ocean-going ships. ​ A huge fusion-powered aircraft was once built as a demonstration,​ but it proved impractical to operate. ​ Thus, most aircraft continue to burn liquid fuel, often biofuels. ​ Most of the rail networks are fusion powered, but only indirectly -- power is fed from stationary fusion plants through the track system to the locomotives. ​ Thus, a reactor is not carried on board the train itself. ​ Also, most automobiles use [[power cells]] which are charged from the electrical grid with fusion-generated electricity.
  
 The larger a polywell reactor is built, the more power it can theoretically produce. ​ However, instead of using a few huge power plants, most colonies have smaller reactors, often in the 150 to 250 megawatt range, forming a more decentralized electrical grid. The larger a polywell reactor is built, the more power it can theoretically produce. ​ However, instead of using a few huge power plants, most colonies have smaller reactors, often in the 150 to 250 megawatt range, forming a more decentralized electrical grid.
polywell_fusion.txt ยท Last modified: 2010/01/31 01:18 by zobeid